How to make that funny white curly thingy on your head – the barristers’ wig

For those of us who enjoy the handmade, the knitting & crocheting, I came across this lovely post from a site called ‘love crochet‘.

 

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Included are these words from the lady, Alison (Ali), in UK who crocheted the barrister’s wig.  She talks about the historic building in her local town of Maldon, a building once used as the local courthouse in the era when convicts, including children, the abandoned class, were transported to Australia.

And note how she crochets using 100% British wool from the National Trust.

 

I recently moved to Maldon and immediately looked for a knit and natter type group to join. I found the Kitsch knit and stitch group that meets in the lovely Oak House coffee shop in Maldon once a fortnight. It was quite daunting moving to a new town and joining new groups on my own. The group was very friendly and by the end of the first evening I had somehow “volunteered” to crochet a barrister’s wig for a historic building in Maldon where visitors can go on guided tours and try on judges’ gowns. The hall was used as a court room at one time and many locals were deported to Australia for quite minor offences. This included children. The original wig is kept in a special case and a crocheted version had been used for visitors to try, but it had recently been lost. I found a pattern on Ravelry which I adapted, choosing to use 100% British wool from the National Trust.

 

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Yes, sent out here to beautiful Australia, the end product of England’s infamous convict transportation system, it’s great big jail, the fatal shore.

For more on Australia’s origins, ‘the suffering & brutality of England’s infamous convict transportation system’ a must read is Robert Hughes’s enthralling book, ‘The Fatal Shore – the epic of Australia’s founding‘.  I digress.

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If you think you might want a hand-made barrister’s wig for a play, a theatre production, a school dress-up, for a party, or an historical re-enactment, Ali, who crocheted the wig, includes the link to the pattern at Ravelry.

She tells you what you will need to crochet it such as pure wool, needles/hooks, a tapestry needle and so forth.  For more, check out her gorgeous Facebook page, Essex Country Crochet.

Enjoy!

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